Revised Video and Poster of Main Idea and Supporting Detail, Two Akha Brothers Catch a Turtle

The Video can be downloaded

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The outcome created on the video is from these basic directions:

1. Create one or two sentences that express the answers to these two questions:

What is the topic?

What does the author want you to know?

2. List Three Supporting Details in Quotes below the main idea statements. These supporting details are copied exactly.

3. Discuss the relationship while pointing at the visual

 

Two Akha Brothers Divided a Turtle

Translated and Compiled by Bai Bibo

Long ago, two Akha brothers went up into a forest to hunt game for making their living. The two had shot a turtle. But because the two of them could not cut open the turtle, nor could they divide it between them, they quarreled with each other without stopping. The two could not think of a way to deal with this issue. At that very moment, they bumped into a man there. Therefore they let him be their go-between. The man was supposed to divide the turtle for them.

But the two Akha brothers were not going to stop their quarreling yet. The elder brother said that he wanted the head. The younger one argued that he wanted the tail.

Since the elder brother wanted the head of the turtle, the go-between cut it off and gave it to him. Since the younger brother wanted the tail, the go-between cut off the tail and gave it to him. The go-between himself took the remainder of the turtle, and as quickly as possible, he ran away and disappeared in the forest.

It is said that the two Akha brothers stood there and stared at each other blankly.

To see the story read in Hani langauge, go to:

http://transitional-literacy.org/wordpress/?page_id=6971

 

The above interactions are based on the following model of language acquisition:

This is a model presented in Unger Liu and Scullion (2015) and further articulated in Unger (2016). This model has evolved from the ideas of Tomasello, 2003, and McCafferty, 2012 and many others.

Specifically, The model below of a Shared Attentional Frame is an adaptation of Tomasello’s (2003) rendering of the “Structure of a linguistic symbol” (p. 29) and a “Joint attentional frame” (p. 26).

McCafferty, S. (2002). Gesture and creating zones of proximal development for second language learning. The Modern Language Journal, 86, 192-202.

Tomasello, M. (2003). Constructing a language: A usage-based theory of language acquisition. Cambridge, MA: Harbard University Press.

Unger, J (2016). Shared Attentional Frames and Sentence Completion Activities: A Process Based Approach to Literacy Assessment. English Scholarship Beyond Borders, 2, 58-120. Retrieved from http://www.englishscholarsbeyondborders.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/John-Unger-2.pdf

Specifically, The model below of a Shared Attentional Frame is an adaptation of Tomasello’s (2003) rendering of the “Structure of a linguistic symbol” (p. 29) and a “Joint attentional frame” (p. 26).

Evoloving Model Shared Attentional Frame-Evolving Model 10-20-14_0001

 

 

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